Everlane Cheeky Jeans 6-Month Check-up

It’s been 7 months since I purchased my first pair of Everlane cheeky straight jeans in washed black and 6 since I added the indigo blue, so it felt like time to check in on how the jeans are holding up.

Everlane cheeky jeans  paired with a secondhand Madewell bodysuit and Everlane modern loafers.

Everlane cheeky jeans paired with a secondhand Madewell bodysuit and Everlane modern loafers.

While my initial cheeky straight jean review focused on the black wash, this followup will focus on the indigo wash, which I added in to my closet in October because I was so pleased with the cut and fit of the first pair. I’ve ended up wearing the indigo wash easily 3–5 times a week since then.

Both pairs of jeans are still in my closet despite waffling on whether to sell the black pair since I favor the blue. I ended up agreeing with the readers who said, “What’s wrong with keeping something you wear even if it’s not worn as often as other things?” And it’s true, I wear the blue pair probably three times as often as the black pair, but sometimes the black pair is just what I want. Or I spill salad dressing on the blue pair and they are in the wash and I need my straight leg jean fix. But I digress.


My original review

My initial takeaways from trying the black wash cheeky jean in September were that I liked the rise, the length was a little cropped but fine, and that the only downside was some bunching of the waistband when I sat. At the time I did not find the pocket lining sticking out (a problem reported by other wearers) to be problematic.


Jeans & loafers forever.

Jeans & loafers forever.

My updated take

I found the length to be slightly cropped on my tall legs even in the regular length, but it turns out they are just the right length for pairing with ankle boots. The top of my boots just graze the bottom of the jeans. In warmer weather they are a nice length to pair with ballet flats or loafers without veering into pedal-pusher/capri territory.

The major thing I would change from my initial review is that the pocket lining does in fact like to stick out most of the time, but moreso on the blue pair than the black pair, for whatever reason.

Eventually it bothered me enough that I sewed together part of the pocket and lining on the right front pocket of the blue pair. The left pocket lining only pokes out a little bit and I can ignore it. I can still use the pocket I stitched just fine and you can’t tell from the outside that anything was changed, but the lining doesn’t come out anymore.

I’m curious to know if the re-issued 100% cotton 90’s cheeky has the same pocket lining issue or whether Everlane ponied up and made the denim part a little more generous so the lining doesn’t pucker out as easily.


A little bit of fraying on the rear seam.

A little bit of fraying on the rear seam.


A very unflattering angle but you can see the brushed texture on the thighs.

A very unflattering angle but you can see the brushed texture on the thighs.

After wearing these a ton and washing then several times, the blue denim has gotten weirdly pilly on the tops of the thighs and butt. I would describe it as the fabric softening and gaining almost a brushed texture. It’s noticeable in certain lights but also isn’t a huge problem except if it turns out to be indicative of the fabric breaking down.

There is some light wear/fraying along the edge seam down the rear, where I assume the jeans are getting a lot of wear from sitting. The fabric seems a little more worn in around the bottom of the butt and between the thighs where the fabric rubs. It’s unclear whether it has plateaued to a point of worn-in-ness and will hold steady or if this is a continuing digression into rip/tear territory. Hoping maybe just the former.


Popped belt loops — the new popped collar?

Popped belt loops — the new popped collar?


Another aesthetic area of note is the creasing of the waistband, where different thicknesses of fabric meet. The crease began as a product of the previously reported waistband bunching from when I sit.

The crease is now omnipresent and pronounced at the top edge of where the fabric of the lower jeans is sandwiched between the two pieces of waistband. I can feel the difference in fabric thickness between the top and bottom of the waistband. The part of the waistband above the crease feels less substantial in comparison to the bottom part, which has more layers of fabric. I wish the whole waistband had the same consistency as this would make it less likely to permanently crease in one spot.


Just a tiny pucker on the edge of the pocket where I sewed it down to the pocket lining.

Just a tiny pucker on the edge of the pocket where I sewed it down to the pocket lining.


You’ll notice the front belt loops have kind of frozen in a perma-flop. I wear my work ID badge clipped to the right loop and so it gets tugged down with the weight of the badge everyday. When the badge isn’t there the loop stays curled up on itself. In my opinion there’s like an eighth inch or quarter inch too much extra fabric on the loop and when it’s not pinning down a belt there’s nowhere for it to go to lay flat. Overall nothing I’m losing sleep over, but when I launch my denim empire, I’ll be designing the belt loops with tighter fit.


Perhaps my favorite photo of my butt.

Perhaps my favorite photo of my butt.


In conclusion

I still love these jeans and will recommend them to someone who is interested.

The jeans remain comfortable and easy to move around in. I favor them for times when I know I’ll be getting physical, like climbing up on top our condo building with roof inspectors or helping my dad move furniture around at his new house. They look good with or without a belt.

I like them best pulled out of the dryer after a wash because then they have that snug form-fitting quality. They loosen up after a wear or two but I am OK with that. I’m happy with the size I chose, 27. Because of the high waist and thoughtfully seamed back yoke, I think they are a good choice for pear-shapes like me with some curve to their hips but a smaller waist.

They are showing some signs of wear after six months of heavy use, but remain more than presentable, in my opinion. While there’s room for improvement on the design and production side that would make them an even better jean, at $68 they are a good value for what you get, if what you want to get is a sustainably-conscious straight-leg jean.

Still keepers.


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